Teads’ Female Innovators: Giorgia Fontana

Our last and final woman is Giorgia Fontana. Giorgia is an Innovator for the Marketing team in Italy. Congratulations!

1.Tell us about your journey to, and within, Teads  

I joined this company as a timid intern almost two years ago. I had done 10 interviews in different places and I had been confirmed by 7 of them, but I had no doubts about which one to choose: Teads was the only one that made me feel at home, even during an interview, which usually is a stressful situation.

I followed my instinct and it’s turned up that it was the best choice. I’ve never been treated as an intern. I’ve been treated as a talented resource, even when I had no idea of what my strengths were. I’ve been encouraged to take on my responsibilities and to grow at the same rhythm as the company, overcoming my own limits every day. Now, I’m a manager and writing these words makes me feel proud and grateful to the ones who have been my guides during this path.

  1. What does being an innovator mean to you?

First of all, an innovator is a team player. Despite I haven’t such a long experience, this is the first lesson I learned. The power of different minds that work as one is astonishing. An innovator must have the patience to listen to other people, the humility to renounce to their ideas when others are better, the imagination to look at the final product, even when it’s just the beginning. A person who learns all this has the secret recipe to reinvent their whole life and this is what being an innovator means to me.

  1. What woman inspires you and why?  

Usually, I look for my inspirations in the present, but both the women who have marked my life the most lived in the past. One is a personal point of reference, the other one is a public one.

The first is my auntie Valeria, who taught me that being strong is not a matter of age and is definitely not a matter of choice.

The second one is Jane Austen, who publicly gave women the right to use irony, the greatest richness we could have.

  1. If you could go back and give your teenage self advice for the future, what would it be?  

Stay focused. Don’t waste even a single day being lazy and thinking that your objectives are utopian. Hard work will never be unnoticed and will always pay, sometimes after years, some others after few days. Be a visionary and be an explorer. If the tools you have, the city you live in, the people who surround you make you shrink, don’t abandon them: have a tour elsewhere and then come back and make them richer.

  1. What is the most memorable piece of advice you ever received?  

Remember that the most important thing in life is people. Don’t be scared to favor human relationships, as they help to determine who we are and they represent the biggest contribution to our happiness. Isn’t happiness the final objective we all aim to, in the end?

  1. Within the next year, what do you wish to accomplish?  

I would love to see my first article published. When I was little I had the ambition to become a writer. Growing up, my aspirations changed and moved towards digital, but I’ve never given up on my original dream. Publishing an article about digital would crown both my ambitions and would represent the perfect intersection of my past and my present, giving a new boost to my future

  1. What is your biggest wish/hope for the next generation of successful women?

That they will feel safe. Safe while walking in the streets, safe in their being women, mums, wives, girlfriends and professionals, safe in covering their road to success. And also, that they still find something to fight against, even if in a less sexist world, because “fighting against something” always means “fighting for something else” and this is the strongest fuel to motivate talents.